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Claymore's sleeper 4efe+t-t build (aka the N/Anza?)


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2 hours ago, Sam44 said:

a big thumbs up from me. 

i always try and use fan shrouding these ramp up air flow threw the radiator increasing heat transfer and radiator performance quite a lot.

another area to look at is the front sealing edges. the radiator has is a natural air flow restriction this leads to air flowing around the edges (air spillage), this can reduce heat exchange performance massively.     

   

Its quite an interesting subject and I learned some interesting stuff whilst researching the intercooler setup from corky bell and the Jeff Hartman books. They're just heat exchangers after all.

The current fan I'm using is straight blade (better), it is ducted (has an outer ring to draw air through rather than in at the sides) and sits as close to the radiator as possible. It's deffo more effective than the Toyota model it replaced as it runs for less time to cool the coolant the same amount the O.E. fan did.

The bonus of the shorter rad width is that a fan now covers more of the core. Where as before the wider radiator only had approx. half covered by the fan and made the shroud all the more important. The downsides of adding a full size fan shroud to the radiator are obviously the added weight and extra depth (needs to be mounted with an air gap to the core) in a crowded engine bay. 

The downsides of the thicker core are: the thicker a core gets the more resistant to airflow through them they are (assuming no other changes to fin density etc). Also the second half of a cores thickness only does about 25% of the work. Stands to reason really because the air flowing through absorbs heat and the further through the core it travels the hotter it gets, the closer in temp. the air gets to the object it's cooling the worse it is at absorbing heat.

It's deffo an improvement if you can duct air into a heat exchanger rather than letting the air hit the face and (taking the path of least resistance) spill round the sides. A vertical wall down the centre of the bay opening reaching from rad to bumper would improve the air direction into the rad, the other 3 sides are currently ok and offer some form of ducting / help and therefore less gain to be had. 

Other issues arise from obstructions i.e. bumpers, oil coolers, intercoolers etc. all are necessary components but their location and design can also play havoc with trying to cool an engine. It often ends up with pre-heated air from other heat exchangers being fed to the radiator reducing its efficiency where as a more suitably sized intercooler (or a different shape) and a relocated oil cooler matrix would leave at least 50% rad core receiving road draft air.

It's a fascinating subject and I really did enjoy researching it. I've only scratched the surface (and typed up hardly any of it here) but there is some great info out there and well worth a read.

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yep water/liquid on the exchanger surface aids convection/heat transfer.  also the space at the rear needs to be relatively low pressure/largish.  

heat ex changers are a big part of my work. 

one of the down sides is the effects on gearbox oil temp and air charge temps.  

ive opted to run a lower temp thermostat as well as improve heat transfer from the piston crown threw the cylinder bores by increasing/maintaining great engine block coolant pressure. over 30 psi threw out the rpm range. 78deg thermostat off the 5efe paseo give good in cab heating. as well as improves engine power output/reduces peak engine running temps.  

instead of changing the radiator.  

Edited by Sam44
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16 hours ago, Sam44 said:

yep water/liquid on the exchanger surface aids convection/heat transfer.  also the space at the rear needs to be relatively low pressure/largish.  

heat ex changers are a big part of my work. 

one of the down sides is the effects on gearbox oil temp and air charge temps.  

ive opted to run a lower temp thermostat as well as improve heat transfer from the piston crown threw the cylinder bores by increasing/maintaining great engine block coolant pressure. over 30 psi threw out the rpm range. 78deg thermostat off the 5efe paseo give good in cab heating. as well as improves engine power output/reduces peak engine running temps.  

instead of changing the radiator.  

Never believed in low temp. thermostats.

The thermostat is to help heat an engine up quickly from cold and maintains temp. at low load and cruise. As soon as it increases to high load, coolant temps. increase rapidly to 100+ deg C and the thermo is wide open, having no effect at temperature regulation as the coolant flows freely to the radiator. The radiator is responsible for cooling the engine at high load and not the thermostat, it might as well not be there.

Also the engineers at the factory designed and manufactured the engines to specific tolerances to run at the original operating temperature and changing this may affect the clearances and wear on some engines, not such a problem on a dedicated track car but as a daily driver you would be spending more time running with the engine at the new, lower operating temps. Coolant temp. is also related to ECU fuelling so may adversely affect that also.

The cooler the cylinder walls of an engine become the greater the thermal offset to the combustion process meaning they are better at absorbing heat from the combustion (quenching effect) and as we know, combustion heat = power. Obviously it is a balancing act of the correct amount of heat in the correct components of the engine, cool enough to resist detonation and keep the piston temps. acceptable with the head hot enough to vaporise the required fuel etc. blah blah.......

Personally I would look into more efficient or larger radiators but its your build. I did read an interesting article on it which made sense to me.

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Thermostat temps are primarily aimed at in cab heat/comfort/deforsting.

Best power is normally produced around 60 to 70deg block temps. Which is to low to defrost the screen. 

The fan is primarily used for low speed or static temps reduction. 

Block pressure packs water molecules closer together this improves heat transfer from the cylinders mainly the 4efe cast iron top ring which will reduce wear with it being boosted.  

pressure also stops bubbles forming on the water jacket side of the cylinder walls. when this happens the bubbles/air gap forms an insulation stopping heat transfer. this will generally take place at high flow low pressure points like cylinder 1&2 on the 4e + 5e engines. (the coolant channels in the head gasket shows me the high flow point, also the position of the water pump/low pressure) 

Also helping the cast alloy piston and poorly Lubricanted little end. 

Keep up the good work, it's a very interesting subject for sure. 

The 4e and 5e coolant system in general is a poor design. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Sam44
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Posted (edited)

4efe Timing adjustment.

Bought a cheap Accuspark timing light to check and adjust the timing.

The instructions said to open the casing and check that none of the internals had become dislodged in transit. I removed the screws and opened the case to find this. As I have no idea what it should look like inside and there were no obvious breakages I reassembled it and moved on :unknw:.

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To adjust the timing you need to put the car into diagnostic mode by shorting the TE1 and E1 contacts in the diag. port with an opened out paper clip or wire. As I still have the original factory sticker under the bonnet 🧐, the settings and procedure are listed on it.

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So after shorting the pins, attaching the timing light battery terminals, attaching the inductive loop to ht lead no.1 (note the direction of spark and point the arrow towards the spark plug) I started the engine. The timing marks on the pulley are a bit shit as the one closest the belt cover is hidden by the alternator belt and the second mark wasn't particularly easy to see so I stopped the engine, highlighted the pulley mark with Tippex and re-started the engine. The old paint marks on the distributor put the timing at 15 deg. btdc which is too much for the 10 deg +/-2 deg. (basically anywhere from 8-12 degrees btdc is acceptable). I set mine at 10 (ish.) by loosening the 2 x m 8 bolts and gently moving the distributor body to adjust until the pulley mark lined up with the 10 mark on the belt cover. Locked back into place. Engine off, paperclip out, timing light back in the box.

Gave the engine bay a quick detailing, not really my thing but neat and tidy is fine by me. Trying to keep it looking factory.

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Added a can of injector cleaner to the tank (probably bollocks) and filled up with Super unleaded (pointless) and have been conducting the "Italian tune up" every chance I get.

Been out driving it for a few weeks now and the corolla inlet manifold has made an improvement. The low down torque has increased slightly and it is also more eager to pull to the redline where as before it became breathless quite quickly above 5k. It feels like a slightly larger capacity engine overall. I had also driven with the timing at 15 deg. and reducing it to 10 seems to have had a small improvement also (could be psychological) and the idle seems more stable since the timing change. There is also more noise from the PCV hose to manifold (a sort of rushing noise) that wasn't noticeable with the Starlet manifold. Still has the little growl from the intake resonator aswell :thumbsup:.

Hiding :ph34r:

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Edited by Claymore
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  • 3 months later...

Not really a huge update but took Nanza for an MOT and I always like to remove the Rear ARB in case the tester gets lazy and decides to jack it up on the D bushes to check the wheel bearings etc.

Can safely say that the corrosion resistance is not the best on the whiteline product. I only drove it once on a gritted / salted road last year and maybe on a couple of damp days so the level of white rust and red rust is pretty bad considering. Thankfully the threads are still usable.

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Also with all the fuel shortage business I had to drain some from the tank for other more important uses. Read an old thread on the forum about running the fuel pump from the diagnostic socket when the engine is off. 

Disconnected the return fuel line and plugged the hose to the tank and ran a new hose to a fuel can from the fuel rail return. 

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If you connect the FP and +B pins in the diagnostic port the fuel pump will run when the ignition is turned to position 2. I made a switched bridging connection so I could turn off the fuel pump from inside the engine bay rather than having to run round to the ignition switch to control it. Obviously fuel is dangerous so don't do any of this!

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All washed up ready for winter storage.

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Edited by Claymore
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I do like your approach to this Claymore no silly stuff going on just a nice simple set of springs and wheels it really looks honest so many rough examples around now fair play to you  

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5 hours ago, burty said:

I do like your approach to this Claymore no silly stuff going on just a nice simple set of springs and wheels it really looks honest so many rough examples around now fair play to you  

Thanks mate :thumbsup:

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  • 3 weeks later...

Small update for today.

Re-fitted the rear arb and manage to strip the thread on one of the U-bolts. Didn't need much to do it in.

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Thankfully a neighbour of mine had donated some exhaust U-bolt clamps to me a while ago and one was the correct 75mm Diameter (bottom in photo) so I cleaned it up and used that instead.

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Also noticed that the silicone hose I'd used for the PCV breather was "sweating" some oil out of it in use. Hoped it would be ok but un-lined silicone is porous and of course it leaked. I've ordered some more suitable replacement to fit with the cam cover refurb.

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